University of South Carolina Aiken's
Office of Career Services

Getting Involved with Job Shadowing


Career decision-making can be difficult! But, even as a freshman in college, students can begin formulating a career strategy by making contacts and exploring various career paths through classes and extra-curricular activities. Career Services offers several tips and ideas for getting involved with job shadowing.

Often we listen to what other people tell us about certain careers, but do they really know about those careers? Do they talk positively or negatively about a specific career because it merely relates to their likes and dislikes? Other times we read about careers. We can get a basic sense of the position, but still have a lot of questions. Are there any better ways to get this type of information? How about straight from the horseís mouth.

Experiential learning is a key method to gaining practical insight into today's workforce. Talking to a professional who is in the field you are interested in is one of the best ways to learn the ins and outs of careers. Job shadowing is merely the process of meeting with these professionals and observing the daily activities that they (professionals) undertake in their careers. So, how might a student at USCA take advantage of an experience like this? One way is to contact the Career Services Office. One of the resources in our office is a database of employers who are very willing to have students come and shadow their professions. Many individuals have been able to say ìyeahî or ìnayî about a particular career by spending less than an hour seeing a professional in action first hand. So for those students who have some uncertainty about career direction, consider job shadowing as an effective way to help with that decision-making process.
 
Career Services Page
Job Shadowing Information
Job Shadowing Resources
University of South Carolina Aiken
Ruth Patrick Science Center


http://rpsec.usca.sc.edu/Classwork/731sp2003/Lesson/Brown/shadowmain.html (February, 2003)
The views expressed here are not necessarily those of the University of South Carolina.